The (Web) Edit

The Art & Culture articles on our weekend reading list.
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The Art & Culture articles on our weekend reading list.
Collage by Emily Zirimis via Man Repeller

Collage by Emily Zirimis via Man Repeller

There are so many smart thoughts around the web this week—here are a few of our favorites. 

Art makes society kinder: “Art offers new perspectives on universal issues. It teaches empathy, often evokes strong emotions, and inspires critical thinking. It should come as no surprise that it also makes us kinder.” (Co.Design)

How to be your best self: “You’ve got to lean way in to what you already are… look right at the worst — the so-called worst — things about yourself and figure out how to celebrate those things.” (Man Repeller)

Motherhood isn’t sacrifice: By reframing motherhood as a privilege, we redirect agency back to the mother, empowering her, celebrating her autonomy instead of her sacrifice. (The New York Times)

Have smartphones destroyed a generation?: “The arrival of the smartphone has radically changed every aspect of teenagers’ lives, from the nature of their social interactions to their mental health.” (The Atlantic)

Strengthening the resilience muscle: “We don’t have a fixed amount of resiliency, we don’t need to face and overcome tragedy to grow it, and our resilience helps both ourselves and others.” (Goop)

Let black kids just be kids: “People of all races see black children as less innocent, more adultlike and more responsible for their actions than their white peers. In turn, normal childhood behavior, like disobedience, tantrums and back talk, is seen as a criminal threat when black kids do it.” (The New York Times)



The (News) Edit

The news cycle is fast and furious—which is why we shifted through the recent noise and found a few articles we believe matter. These thoughts and ideas made us pause, think and, most importantly, consider what is happening in the world. We hope they do the same for you.

On Our Nightstands

Our March Must-Read Books

This month, after a particularly tenuous few weeks in the U.S., we’ve compiled a book list of narratives that encourage empathy, compassion and expanded worldviews.