The (News) Edit

This week's political happenings include a call to save our democracy, a challenge to campus rape policies and more.
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Original Artwork by Rosie Bowker

Original Artwork by Rosie Bowker

The news and politics cycle is fast and furious —which is why we shifted through the recent noise and found a few articles we believe matter. These thoughts, questions and ideas made us pause, think and, most importantly, consider what is happening in our world. We hope they do the same for you.

Bipartisan friendships in the age of Trump: “Now, fixtures of Washington’s bipartisan political-social circuit say that the exceptionally polarizing nature of the Trump White House is making it harder than ever to maintain that climate of quiet collegiality.” (Town&Country)

Two former presidents came together for a conversation on humility and power: "I think it's really important to know what you don't know and listen to people who do know what you don't know." (Presidential Leadership Scholars)

State legislatures passed several major pieces of legislation benefiting families: “Appetite for these policies only continues to grow, so as the federal government continues to drag its feet, more and more states and cities are stepping up.” (The New York Times)

Campus rape policies are being questioned: “While it is important that rights of accused students, faculty, or staff members are protected, we cannot afford to have colleges be less accountable when allegations of sexual violence surface.” (Elle)

Don’t let our democracy collapse: “House Republicans are moving to abolish the United States Election Assistance Commission, a bipartisan federal agency that serves as a clearinghouse for information about best voting practices and certifies the security of voting machines. Does that sound like a good idea right now?” (The New York Times)

What’s broken — and what’s still working — in American politics: “But it was conceivable before the inauguration that parts of the government might simply stop functioning, with no one empowered to make day-by-day operating decisions. Things are different now than they used to be, but the main functions go on.” (The Atlantic)

Why Senate Republicans can’t agree to repeal Obamacare: “Why can't they find agreement? Each senator has a different reason to oppose the legislation—from ideology to re-election concerns to the demographics and health nuances of individual states.” (CNN)

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