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The (News) Edit

The articles on our weekend reading list.
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Art: Elizabeth Peyton. Angela, 2017. Oil on board, 16.9˝ x 13.8˝.Photo: Courtesy of the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels, via VOGUE 

Art: Elizabeth Peyton. Angela, 2017. Oil on board, 16.9˝ x 13.8˝.Photo: Courtesy of the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels, via VOGUE 

There are so many smart thoughts around the web this week—here are a few of our favorite.

Still resisting: “6 months ago we may have temporarily lost our country, but collectively, we found its soul.” (Sarah Sophie Flicker)

Why men need to stick up for women: “Women, already impeded and imperiled by sexism, also have to carry the social stigma of being feminist buzzkills if they call attention to it. People of color not only have to deal with racism; they also have to deal with white people labeling them “angry” or “hostile” or “difficult” for objecting.” (The New York Times)

On conversations with fathers: “My father read to me when I was a small child and would add his own interpretations. “Cinderella” was about injustice, “Snow White” about the corruption of power and privilege, and “The Wizard of Oz” about individual rights.” (The New Yorker)

Bringing ‘Ms.” to the masses: “They were roommates and lifelong friends: The black woman who fought to be called "Miss" instead of condescended to as "Mary," and the white woman who pushed to be called "Ms." because it was nobody's business if she was married.” (NPR)

Angela Merkel, the most powerful woman in the world: “Suddenly Merkel’s astonishing trajectory—from the ash heap of the failed Soviet Empire to becoming the West’s best hope—makes perfect sense: Endure, observe, listen, keep your own counsel, and work twice as hard as the men. Even now.” (Vogue)

Real moms on their real screen time rules: “We’ve gone through many stages of screen time rules—strict time limits, loosely encouraging ‘balance,’ no rules at all—and they’ve all had their pros and cons.” (Mother Mag)

Jane Austen, political symbol of early feminism: “Austen’s name and image were used prominently in the street activism, political stage, and issue-oriented fundraisers of the women’s movement’s first wave, yet you’d never know it from our histories of her legacy.” (Lit Hub)

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